Introduction to Tectonics - Old Video (GCSE How Science Works KS3: Journey 1 day ago   14:04

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geographypods
Nice introduction to KS3 or GCSE Tectonics. Love the snails!

Comments 28 Comments

BZE_Bubbles
ʕノ•ᴥ•ʔノ ︵ ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
BZE_Bubbles
2019 geography class?????
ツHalo
can anyone give me a guide to where she talks about landforms?
Elliptical
my geography teacher told me to watch this
Comiload 2.0
14 MINS ARE YOU KIDDING ME?
its ya boi howie
why am i watching something from 2011
Charlotte VENABLES
What was the relevance to the snails😂
fahad malik
watching in 2017...
Sehal Printer
nice
Parity Cuber
I hate this video, I wanted to die.... whoever made this sucks 🍆
DragracequeenXx
Me and my best friend called the snails Gerry and Alexander 😂😂❤
xXSnowy99Xx
whats with all the snails?
Zakaria Sulieman
14 mins! ); just wanted to relax on my holidays school.
Trollstar123
This is AWSOME!!!!!!!
Mishfaq
really nice
Shlazey
HA 3000 degrees. Its close to 6000. xD This is so damned old.
lizziebw
i know
Roger Wright
Oh I like the looks of this for my young budding geographers at KS3
Benpai
CHAAAAARGE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
A Dizzle
i'm surprised this is in colour
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How Science Works KS3: Journey Introduction to Tectonics - Old Video (GCSE 1 day ago   13:41

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Clive Oppenheimer, a volcanologist working on the latest techniques to monitor and predict volcanic eruptions, demonstrates his work at Mount Etna, an active volcano in Sicily.

Download videos and extensive curriculum and CPD resources at http://www.acoustics.salford.ac.uk/schools/

Volcanic eruptions pose a real threat to communities living nearby, and at their most violent they have wiped out whole cities. Clive is an expert in developing new techniques for monitoring volcanoes, and works with scientists around the world. It's a difficult job, because most of the activity happens deep below ground.

Clive meets with his research students who monitor the volcanoes. To look at how the latest techniques are developing, he takes a trip up Etna to collect fresh lava samples, then heads to the Institute of Volcanology (INGV), about 20 km away, to analyse some of the new data.